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Fall outlook at US, Canadian veterinary schools

Programs juggle safety, finances, teaching against backdrop of shifting pandemic

July 31, 2020 (published)
By Anna Lewis

Colleges and universities across the U.S. and Canada are finalizing plans for the fall semester as they weigh slashed budgets, student financial burdens and safety against the need to maintain a high-quality education during the coronavirus pandemic.

The VIN News Service contacted the 37 veterinary schools in both countries to ask what the fall semester will look like and how budgets and tuition will be affected. Thirty-four responded.

Owing to the possible economic hardships of the pandemic on students, many schools are holding tuition steady. Tuition and fees at 20 programs are unchanged or rising only nominally. In one of the 20, the University of Minnesota, a fee decrease is even bringing down prices slightly, and nonresident tuition at Michigan State University is down significantly.

Officials at some programs recognize that students could use further financial help.

"When [students] come back in the fall, we're going to probably try to subsidize them with more scholarships to assist them, dependent on their financial need …. [W]e anticipate a greater financial need for them and we are trying to find external support for them in the fall," said Dr. Ruby Perry, dean of Tuskegee College of Veterinary Medicine in Alabama.

At the same time, institutions are dealing with significant revenue losses and new expenses during the COVID-19 crisis, along with cuts in state allocations and private donations.

"Tuskegee University is a private institution, so we’re going to be hit pretty hard," Perry said, citing a strain on donations and endowments. Other deans attributed losses in part to decreased revenues at teaching hospitals due to the shift to emergency-only services, along with the overall economic slowdown.

Additionally, administrators reported mounting expenses related to infection-prevention measures such as placing plexiglass and navigation signs in school buildings. Expenses have also begun piling up from purchasing personal protective equipment (PPE) and laundering scrubs for students; testing for the virus that causes COVID-19; buying and developing technology and software to assist with online delivery of material; and covering for staff on sick leave.

To balance their budgets, many administrators told VIN News that they expect to freeze hiring and cut projects.

When it comes to instruction, most schools plan on some variation of a hybrid model, with lectures online but labs and clinical rotations done in person. Many deans said students' ability to participate in hands-on clinical training and labs is especially important. Still, some schools have deployed digital tools for remote lab studies. Colorado State University, for example, has been using virtual reality programs.

Dr. Phillip Nelson, dean of Western University College of Veterinary Medicine in Pomona, California, said, "We're doing everything we can to meet the learning standards that our accrediting body expects us to meet, as well as the standards of the curriculum as designed by the faculty. However, safety is our number one goal right now."

At Oregon State University, clinical rotations will continue, said Dr. Susan Tornquist, dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine. Students will be required to self-monitor daily via an app that records body temperature, symptoms and possible exposure to coronavirus. Other schools require students to complete a daily online symptom checklist before heading to class.

To prevent students from carrying the coronavirus back to campus after Thanksgiving-break travel, some schools, such as Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine, said they will start classes early in order to finish by the November holiday. Students arriving at the University of Prince Edward Island in Canada for the beginning of the semester will be required to self-isolate for two weeks. The University of Missouri is encouraging students to limit contact with others for two weeks before the first day of classes.

Many schools reported that externships will still be available and that partner practices are receptive to, and some even enthusiastic about, receiving students, but students will be limited in where they will be allowed to go. At North Carolina State University, for instance, students may choose an externship in-state and within 500 miles of the Raleigh campus, and either the student or the practice will be able to cancel the arrangement at any time. Most schools say they will not offer international electives or externships.

While it's too soon to gauge student reaction to fall plans, changes last spring were well-received. A survey about COVID-19 impacts conducted by the Veterinary Business Management Association, the Veterinary Information Network and the VIN Foundation found that roughly 83% of students perceived their school's response to the pandemic as reasonable. Seventy-nine percent of students' school communities enacted business closures and stay-at-home orders, and 83.4% of students reported that clinical learning had moved online. For some, the coming semester's restrictions will be lighter as schools return to partial in-person instruction.

Details of each school's fall plans follow.

Auburn University
Auburn, Alabama
Incoming class: 130 students, about 30% in-state
Fall plans: Courses online, in person or a hybrid, depending on the needs of the class. Masks and social distancing required. Most quizzes and exams to be held remotely. Coursework will be complete before Thanksgiving break, and finals will be held remotely.
Clinical learning: Some in person, some remote, depending on group size
Distributive learning: Training at off-campus practices is optional. Self-monitoring for symptoms and adherence to state requirements enforced; adherence to U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations encouraged. Some practices unwilling to host students at this time.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $22,880 (resident), $49,040 (nonresident); 11.1% and 1.6% increase, respectively, from last year
2020-21 budget: $87 million
Source: Jayne Hart, director of communications and marketing, College of Veterinary Medicine

Colorado State University
Fort Collins, Colorado
Incoming class: 138 students, 50% in-state
Fall plans: Remote classes, some synchronous and some asynchronous, incorporating shorter sessions and more frequent low-stakes assessments. In-person labs will take place according to public health guidelines; students assigned into fixed cohorts.
Clinical learning: Cohorts will be fixed and in larger spaces. When a section cannot accommodate all students, groups are divided into a clinic group and an off-site group. Off-site students will use simulations and virtual models. The teaching hospital has resumed operations.
Distributive learning: Preceptorships and externships available and encouraged, pending approval of health and safety features by the faculty practicum coordinator; international programs limited.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $38,962 (resident), $62,660 (nonresident); 2.6% and 2.1% increase, respectively*
2020-21 budget: 2% to 6% reduction, based on department; no layoffs or furloughs
Source: Dr. Mark Stetter, dean, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences
*Tuition unchanged but fees increased.

Cornell University
Ithaca, New York
Incoming class: 120 students, in-state proportion comparable to past*
Fall plans: Online and on-campus lab options will be available. Social distancing and face coverings will be required on campus.
Clinical learning: Pending; dependent upon state regulations in effect at the time
Distributive learning: Pending; dependent upon state regulations in effect at the time
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $38,250 (resident), $56,824 (nonresident); 3% and 3.8% increase, respectively
2020-21 budget: Pending
Source: Melissa Osgood, media relations, College of Veterinary Medicine
*About 55%, according to information on the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges website

Iowa State University
Ames, Iowa
Incoming class: 155 students, 40% in-state
Fall plans: Large lectures will be online. Smaller classes and labs will be in person; social distancing and face masks required.
Clinical learning: Began as a hybrid model. Full clinical rotations as of July 6, with social distancing and masks.
Distributive learning: Preceptorships and externships allowed; will follow standard operating procedure.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $25,497.90 (resident), $54,581.90 (nonresident); unchanged from last year
2020-21 budget: 5% decrease. There will be no salary increases.
Source: Dr. Dan Grooms, dean, College of Veterinary Medicine

Kansas State University
Manhattan, Kansas
Incoming class: 124 students, 40% in-state
Fall plans: Social distancing and face masks required. Classes with fewer than 50 students will be in person; online or hybrid for more than 50. After Thanksgiving, distance learning only.
Clinical learning: Labs and clinical instruction prioritized for in-person classes. Clinical learning has been ongoing since May 26.
Distributive learning: Externships are available.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $25,916 (resident), $56,478 (nonresident); unchanged
2020-21 budget: Pending
Source: Dr. Bonnie Rush, dean, College of Veterinary Medicine

Lincoln Memorial University
Harrogate, Tennessee
Did not respond to questions. Some information obtained from website.
Incoming class: Unable to obtain
Fall plans: In-person return to campus is planned, with some virtual aspects. Social distancing and masks required.
Clinical learning: Unable to obtain
Distributive learning: Unable to obtain
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $49,512*; 3.5% increase
2020-21 budget: Unable to obtain
*Tuition for in-state and out-of-state students is the same.

Long Island University
Brookville, New York
Responded to some questions. Some information obtained from website.
Incoming class: 100 students
Fall plans: In-person instruction with social distancing and laboratories (anatomy, veterinary skills) conducted, wearing personal protective equipment (PPE)
Clinical learning: Allowed at selected sites.
Distributive learning: All clinical learning is distributive.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $56,916*
2020-21 budget: Not provided
Source: Dr. Carmen Fuentealba, dean, College of Veterinary Medicine
*New program. Tuition for in-state and out-of-state students is the same.

Louisiana State University
Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Responded to some questions. Some information obtained from website.
Incoming class: 111 students, 68% in-state
Fall plans: Classes with more than 100 students will be online. Classes of 11 to 99 students will meet on alternating days. Ten-person classes may meet normally. Social distancing, face coverings, increased hygiene and symptom-checking required. All online after Thanksgiving.
Clinical learning: The teaching hospital is in reduced-services mode.
Distributive learning: Unable to obtain
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $27,429 (resident), $56,529 (nonresident); unchanged
2020-21 budget: Not provided
Source: Ginger Guttner, communications manager, School of Veterinary Medicine

Michigan State University
East Lansing, Michigan
Incoming class: 115 students, 52% in-state
Fall plans: One-quarter of classes will be in person, one-quarter will be a mix of in-person and online, and half will be online.
Clinical learning: Walk-in patients will be evaluated by students at teaching hospital.
Distributive learning: Information not provided
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $31,628 (resident), $47,436 (nonresident); unchanged and 16% decrease, respectively
2020-21 budget: Pending
Source: Hilda Mejia Abreu, associate dean for admissions, student life, and inclusivity, College of Veterinary Medicine

Midwestern University
Glendale, Arizona
Incoming class: 123 students
Fall plans: Labs that require in-person teaching will have smaller groups. In-person lectures available but not required. Campus building air exchange maximized for safety.
Clinical learning: Operating with smaller groups, following CDC guidelines. Clients not allowed in building.
Distributive learning: Not applicable
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $64,930*; unchanged
2020-21 budget: Declined to provide
Source: Dr. Thomas Graves, dean, College of Veterinary Medicine
*Tuition for in-state and out-of-state students is the same.

Mississippi State University
Starkville, Mississippi
Incoming class: 97 students, 51% in-state
Fall plans: Labs in person, classes mostly in person. Fall term for the first-year class started in June. Small groups, social distancing, assigned seats and masks required. Students have option to participate in classes remotely.
Clinical learning: In person with normal numbers of students, using social distancing, face masks, etc.
Distributive learning: Not applicable
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $27,248.00 (resident); $48,448 (nonresident); unchanged
2020-21 budget: Pending
Source: Dr. Jack Smith, acting associate dean, College of Veterinary Medicine

North Carolina State University
Raleigh, North Carolina
Incoming class: 100 students, 80% in-state
Fall plans: Lectures will be broken into shorter, prerecorded videos, with in-person labs.
Clinical learning: Online and hybrid rotations. Transitioning in August to a mix of on-site, hybrid and a few online rotations.
Distributive learning: Externships required at in-state locations within a 500-mile radius. Safety requirements include masks and social distancing. Student or practice may cancel at any time.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $19,616 (resident), $47,657 (nonresident); unchanged
2020-21 budget: Stable
Source: Dr. Laura Nelson, associate dean, College of Veterinary Medicine

Oklahoma State University
Stillwater, Oklahoma
Incoming class: 106 students, about 55% in-state
Fall plans: Instruction will be at least partially in person, with social distancing and a possibility of transitioning to online learning.
Clinical learning: Staggered rotations. Masks and social distancing required. Contact with clients in hospital minimized.
Distributive learning: Not applicable
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $23,875.10 (resident), $50,140.10 (nonresident); unchanged
2020-21 budget: Expected 4% cut; mitigated by reserve budget and hiring freeze
Source: Dr. Margi Gilmour, associate dean, College of Veterinary Medicine

Oregon State University
Corvallis, Oregon
Incoming class: 72 students, about 55% in-state
Fall plans: Online and in-person instruction.
Clinical learning: Class sizes limited to provide for social distancing. Face masks and self-monitoring for symptoms required.
Distributive learning: Four to eight weeks of preceptorships required for fourth-year students. Sites required to submit information about their risks.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $26,688 (resident), $51,375 (nonresident); 4.6% and 5.3% increase, respectively
2020-21 budget: Pending
Source: Dr. Susan Tornquist, dean, Carlson College of Veterinary Medicine

Purdue University
West Lafayette, Indiana
Incoming class: 84 students, about 50% in-state
Fall plans: Mixture of in-person and recorded/online lectures; all labs in person
Clinical learning: Students will participate in two-week rotations instead of three-week rotations to leave space for an eight-week remote clinical preparatory and orientation course.
Distributive learning: Six weeks of externships required, with safety guidelines for participating practices.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $19,918 (resident), $44,746 (nonresident); unchanged
2020-21 budget: Pending
Source: Dr. Jim Weisman, assistant dean for student affairs, College of Veterinary Medicine

Texas A&M University
College Station, Texas
Did not respond to questions. Some information obtained from website.
Incoming class: Unable to obtain
Fall plans: Some online, some in-person classes. Additional study spaces created outside. Remote options available. Masks required. COVID-19 testing available to students.
Clinical learning: Hospital in reduced-services mode as of June 29.
Distributive learning: Unable to obtain
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $25,852 (residents), $40,849 (nonresidents); 4.9% and 6.2% increase, respectively
2020-21 budget: Unable to obtain

The Ohio State University
Columbus, Ohio
Incoming class: 165 students. Annual goal is 50% in-state.
Fall plans: Online instruction combined with socially-distanced hands-on clinical instruction for first through third year.
Clinical learning: Fourth-year students resumed clinical learning July 6 after eight weeks of virtual instruction. PPE required, as well as social distancing when possible and wearing additional protective equipment when not possible.
Distributive learning: Travel allowed only for college-approved fourth-year externships or other clinical learning experiences and is dependent on university and state guidelines, as well as those of other states.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $33,587 (resident), $72,923 (nonresident*); 1.9% and 0.9% increase, respectively
2020-21 budget: Pending; decrease in state support expected
Source: Dr. Rustin Moore, dean, College of Veterinary Medicine
*Out-of-state students in second through fourth years pay resident tuition rate plus $5 per semester.

Tufts University
North Grafton, Massachusetts
Incoming class: 110 students, about 30% in-state
Fall plans: In-person and remote teaching
Clinical learning: Began in person this summer with safety measures
Distributive learning: Limited clinical externships began this summer with safety measures.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: Resident tuition pending*; $60,694 (nonresident); 4% increase
2020-21 budget: Pending
Source: Dr. Alastair Cribb, dean, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine
*Subsidy contingent on funding of state appropriation.

Tuskegee University
Tuskegee, Alabama
Incoming class: 70 students, about 10% in-state
Fall plans: Labs will be hands-on, with online options. Class sizes will be adjusted for social distancing. Masks required, face shields will be provided. The semester ends at Thanksgiving.
Clinical learning: Social distancing and masks required; face shields will be provided.
Distributive learning: Externships and preceptorships are continuing. There will be a virtual orientation to encourage safe practices.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $44,190*, unchanged
2020-21 budget: Pending; cuts expected
Source: Dr. Ruby Perry, dean, College of Veterinary Medicine
*Tuition for in-state and out-of-state students is the same.

University of Arizona
Tucson, Arizona
Incoming class: 110 students, about 40% in-state
Fall plans: Some classes online; in-person labs with PPE.
Clinical learning: UA veterinary program is new this year. Students are not yet in clinical learning.
Distributive learning: Students are not yet in distributive learning.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $47,000.43 (resident), $71,999.43 (nonresident)*
2020-21 budget: Pending
Source: Dr. Julie Funk, dean, College of Veterinary Medicine
*New program. Annual tuition is fixed for the three-year, year-round program.

University of Calgary
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Did not respond to questions. Some information obtained from website.
Incoming class: Unable to obtain
Fall plans: Courses will be online or in person, determined on a course-by-course basis.
Clinical learning: Unable to obtain
Distributive learning: Unable to obtain
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: About CA$12,500*; unable to obtain comparison with last year
2020-21 budget: Unable to obtain
*Tuition for in-province and out-of-province students is the same.

University of California, Davis
Davis, California
Incoming class: 150 students, 84% in-state
Fall plans: Large classes will be remote. Smaller classes, such as labs, will be in person if necessary, at 25% capacity. Masks and eye coverings mandatory.
Clinical learning: Students in clinical training returned to the hospital June 8. Rotations are staggered and preparatory work that does not require on-site presence is done remotely.
Distributive learning: Voluntary externships allowed, provided students follow safety guidelines, monitor for symptoms and wear masks. Some practices unwilling to accept students at this time.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $32,127 (resident), $44,372 (nonresident); unchanged
2020-21 budget: Cuts from state; details not yet finalized by college.
Source: Dr. Joie Watson, associate dean for professional education, School of Veterinary Medicine

University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida
Incoming class: Pending
Fall plans: Online and in-person instruction available, with masks and social distancing.
Clinical learning: In person, following CDC guidelines
Distributive learning: Not applicable
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students*: $28,786 (resident), $45,500 (nonresident); unchanged
2020-21 budget: Pending
Source: Sarah Carey, director of communications, College of Veterinary Medicine
*Tuition and fees are fixed for all four years of the DVM degree program, according to the university website.

University of Georgia
Athens, Georgia
Incoming class: 126 students; in-state/out-of-state breakdown not provided
Fall plans: About 85% of lectures will be in person or synchronous remote. Live stream with interactive question/polling mode will be used for most lectures. Synchronous remote lectures will primarily be on Zoom (also with polling questions and share-screen interactions) and recorded sessions will be automatically integrated onto the teaching material website. Social distancing, face masks, self-monitoring and staggered schedules required. Face shields required in addition to face masks for labs in which social distancing is not possible. Lab attendance will be staggered. Classes online after Thanksgiving.
Clinical learning: Social distancing, face masks, self-monitoring for symptoms required. Schedules will be staggered to minimize group sizes.
Distributive learning: Not provided
2020-21 tuition and fees for first year students: $19,804 (resident), $49,466 (nonresident); unchanged
2020-21 budget: Figure not provided
Source: Dr. Lisa Nolan, dean, College of Veterinary Medicine

University of Guelph
Guelph, Ontario, Canada
Incoming class: 120 students
Fall plans: Most classes delivered online except for certain technical courses.
Clinical learning: Hospital has returned to normal operations. Essential clinical skills labs will be held in person, following public health guidelines.
Distributive learning: Externships permitted if they can be done in accordance with public health guidelines.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: CA$10,516.60*; unable to obtain comparison with last year
2020-21 budget: Not provided
Source: Karen Mantel, marketing communications officer, Ontario Veterinary College
*In Canada, the DVM program is available only to residents of Ontario.

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Urbana, Illinois
Incoming class: 130 students, about 55% in-state
Fall plans: In-person core instruction. Some electives will be online or a hybrid. Larger, in-person lectures will be simulcast to several rooms.
Clinical learning: Online this summer, moving to in-person on Aug. 3.
Distributive learning: Externships are still willing to take students.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $33,710 (residents), $56,414 (nonresidents); 3.4% and 3.1% increase, respectively
2020-21 budget: Pending
Source: Dr. Jonathan Foreman, associate dean for academic and student affairs, College of Veterinary Medicine

University of Minnesota
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Incoming class: 105 students, 50% in-state
Fall plans: Classes online and in person. Face coverings required. Student density in classrooms will be reduced, and labs will remain in person with consistent groups.
Clinical learning: Fourth-year students return to clinics following gradual reopening of facilities.
Distributive learning: Unable to obtain
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $32,244 (resident), $57,948 (nonresident); 0.3% and 0.2% decrease, respectively, due to reduction in fees
2020-21 budget: Pending
Source: Dr. Margaret Root Kustritz, associate dean of education, College of Veterinary Medicine

University of Missouri
Columbia, Missouri
Incoming class: 124 students, slightly fewer than 50% in-state*
Fall plans: Classes will consist of recorded sessions and hands-on learning with smaller groups and social distancing.
Clinical learning: A limited number of people present for procedures. Masks required.
Distributive learning: Preceptorships still available, provided the location is approved.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $27,841 (resident), $65,170 (nonresident); 2.3% increase
2020-21 budget: 12.5% cut expected
Source: Dr. Carolyn Henry, dean, College of Veterinary Medicine
*More out-of-state applicants accepted seats this year than usual.

University of Montreal
Montreal, Quebec
Incoming class: 96 students — 45 from junior colleges, 51 from universities
Fall plans: Face-to-face classes for first-year students, remote learning for the rest. Lectures simulcast to three classrooms, with a professor in one of the rooms.
Clinical learning: In person, with social distancing and PPE. The term will be extended by two weeks.
Distributive learning: Externships limited to Quebec.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: CA$1,825 per quarter (resident), CA$4,606.95 per quarter (nonresident); unchanged
2020-21 budget: Pending
Source: Dr. Marie Archambault, vice dean of academic affairs, College of Veterinary Medicine

University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Did not respond to all questions. Some information from website.
Incoming class: 122 students, 41% in-state
Fall plans: Lectures and a few labs will be delivered online, both synchronous and asynchronous. Faculty are working to ensure that hands-on activities, including anatomy labs, clinical training and surgical skills training, can take place in person with smaller cohorts.
Clinical learning: Class of 2021 students moved back to in-person, modified clinical rotations on June 29. Full clinical rotations resume Aug. 24. Students will be tested for COVID-19 prior to their arrival at clinics and will be re-tested as they switch campuses. Other students will be tested upon arrival to campus.
Distributive learning: Not provided
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $53,146 (resident), $63,146 (nonresident); 3.1% and 2.6% increase, respectively*
2020-21 budget: Not provided
Source: John Donges, communications coordinator, School of Veterinary Medicine
*Figures reflect fees at 2019-20 rate

University of Prince Edward Island
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada
Incoming class: 68 students, about 65% from Atlantic provinces
Fall plans: Online lectures, with in-person teaching of technical and clinical skills. Students coming from outside of Atlantic Canada required to self-isolate for two weeks upon arrival to the island.
Clinical learning: Began July 6 after a two-month delay. In person, with symptom monitoring, physical distancing, enhanced hygiene and enhanced PPE requirements.
Distributive learning: External electives are limited to local opportunities.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: CAD$14,547*; unchanged
2020-21 budget: Pending
Source: Dr. Leigh Lamont, associate dean, academic and student affairs, Atlantic Veterinary College
*Tuition for in-province and out-of-province students is the same.

University of Saskatchewan
Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
Incoming class: 85 students, primarily from Western provinces
Fall plans: Instruction will be remote with an exemption for medical majors, including veterinary students.
Clinical learning: PPE and symptom monitoring required. Surgeries, physical exams and labs will be in person. Classes will be broken into small, stable cohorts.
Distributive learning: Externships available; international externships prohibited.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: CA$13,277 (resident), CA$68,277 (nonresident); 15% increase
2020-21 budget: CA$40 million
Source: Dr. Chris Clark, associate dean, Western College of Veterinary Medicine

University of Tennessee
Knoxville, Tennessee
Incoming class: 85 students, about 70% in-state
Fall plans: Nearly all lectures online with smaller labs
Clinical learning: Alternating remote and on-site rotations
Distributive learning: Externships allowed but not in distant or risky locations; self-quarantine may be required upon return.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $29,336 (resident), $56,602 (nonresident); unchanged
2020-21 budget: $55 million
Source: Dr. Jim Thompson, dean, College of Veterinary Medicine

University of Wisconsin
Madison, Wisconsin
Incoming class: 96 students, 65% in-state
Fall plans: In-person and remote education until Thanksgiving, then remote only. Face coverings required indoors. Schedules expanded to include evening and Saturday classes, as needed. Lecture courses online, both synchronously and asynchronously. Laboratories and hands-on learning delivered in an altered schedule with a lower density of students.
Clinical learning: The class of 2021 returned to in-hospital learning for clinical rotations on July 6. Everyone in the hospital must follow specific safety and PPE protocols. Initially, each in-person rotation will have half of the students in the hospital and half of the students off-site. Students will work in pairs, using online platforms on a device that they bring into exam rooms, and will work collaboratively on physical examination, history taking, medical records, and preparing for procedures. Students will swap places on a daily or weekly basis, dependent on the rotation.
Distributive learning: Externships for fourth-year students allowed, provided the student provides documentation that the practice environment meets the health and safety standards of the UW Veterinary Care facility. If external training sites do not meet these standards, comparable or substitute clinical training opportunities will be developed within UW Veterinary Care to meet graduate competencies required for professional accreditation and licensure.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $32,902 (resident); $52,150 (nonresident); 3.5% and 3.3% increase, respectively
2020-21 budget: $82.3 million
Source: Dr. Lynn Maki, associate dean for student academic affairs, School of Veterinary Medicine

Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine
Blacksburg, Virginia
Incoming class: 125 students, about 65% in-state
Fall plans: The semester is starting early, and ending before Thanksgiving. Some sessions online, some in person, broken into smaller groups.
Clinical learning: Clinics are delayed for most of class of 2022 until next summer. The class of 2021 starts in August with hybrid model of instruction.
Distributive learning: Externships allowed, provided safety guidelines are followed.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $25,435 (resident), $54,568 (nonresident); nominal increase ($58)
2020-21 budget: Pending
Source: Dr. Jennie Hodgson, associate dean for professional programs

Washington State University
Pullman, Washington
Incoming class: 138 students, 81% in-state
Fall plans: Instruction will consist of online and in-person instruction with reduced in-person class sizes, ranging from 20 to 35 students.
Clinical learning: Reduced class sizes; some online rounds. Face coverings and symptom attestation required. Students to be rotated daily in each clinical block to reduce numbers participating in face-to-face rotations in the Veterinary Teaching Hospital.
Distributive learning: Externships and external rotations still available, but students must complete a safety checklist before going out and will be limited to groups of two when traveling.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $28,426 (resident), $63,838 (nonresident); tuition unchanged, fee increase of $80
2020-21 budget: Expected to be around $98 million
Source: Dr. Robert Mealey, interim dean, College of Veterinary Medicine

Western University of Health Sciences
Pomona, California
Incoming class: 112 students, about 60% from California
Fall plans: The fall semester will be similar to spring 2020; mostly virtual learning for first- and second-year students.
Clinical learning: Hands-on learning available for clinical training, provided it can be done safely. Local conditions will be determinative.
Distributive learning: All clinical learning is distributive. Local conditions will be determinative.
2020-21 tuition and fees for first-year students: $56,027*; tuition unchanged, fee increases of about $450
2020-21 budget: Flat
Source: Dr. Phillip Nelson, dean, College of Veterinary Medicine
*Tuition for in-state and out-of-state students is the same.

Correction: This article has been revised to show tuition and fees as unchanged at the University of California, Davis. Figures previously obtained and confirmed as correct by the university were estimates that had not been labeled as such. Those preliminary figures had indicated a nominal increase in fees.


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